Loughgall (@1.57) vs H & W Welders (@4.1)
05-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Loughgall will win

Loughgall – H & W Welders Match Prediction | 05-10-2019 10:00

3 matches between them have ended in a draw.Loughgall is in poor home form while H&W Welders are performing poor at away.Previous matches between Loughgall and H&W Welders have averaged 3 goals while BTTS has happened 50% of the time. So far this season in the NIFL Championship, Loughgall have averaged 1.2 Points Per Game at home matches and H&W Welders 0.2 Points Per Game at away matches. On 5th October 2019, Loughgall and H&W Welders go head to head in the NIFL Championship. These 2 teams have met 14 times in the last several seasons based on the data that we have of them.Out of 14 previous meetings, Loughgall have won 4 matches while H&W Welders won 7. The last meeting ended with the following result : Loughgall 1 - 2 H&W Welders.

They were also questioned about the 1974 Dublin and Monaghan bombings,[11] and their weapons were checked in relation to forensic evidence from the murders in question.[13] Both protesters and media camped outside Dundalk station. Sir Arthur Galsworthy, then British ambassador to the Republic of Ireland, stressed his concern about the finding of a shotgun and a dagger among the weapons confiscated by the Garda, and the fact that most of the soldiers were in plain clothes, and that the two groups had given different accounts of their purposes of presence within the Republic of Ireland. The British Army Minister, Bob Brown, apologised to the Irish Government, saying the incursion over the border had been a mistake.[8] The British Government, embarrassed by the situation,[12] gave top priority to the immediate release of the soldiers. When it became clear that a trial was unavoidable, the British Government hardened its position, with a member of the Foreign Office proposing economic sanctions against the Republic, and even mooting the creation of a "buffer zone" along the border, which would have created "a no-man's land in which the terrorist could do what they would". The arrest and detention of eight British Army soldiers put Irish Taoiseach Liam Cosgrave and his coalition government in a dilemma; if he released them without charge he was giving a green light for further British military incursions into the Republic, but if he permitted them to be put on trial and they were convicted, diplomatic relations with Britain would be at risk.[8] A report published by Mr Justice Henry Barron in 2006 revealed that the soldiers were questioned whilst in Garda custody about the three murders, especially that of Seamus Ludlow that had been recently committed in the area. The detainees were subsequently moved under heavy armed escort to Dublin, where they were charged by the Special Criminal Court with possession of firearms with intent to endanger life, and for carrying firearms without a certificate.[8] The charges carried a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.[11] The 8 soldiers were released on bail after the British embassy paid 40,000 and a helicopter flew them out of the state. There were concerns that the station could be attacked by a mob or the IRA at any moment seeking to get at the prisoners.

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It thinks it can defeat them. Thousands of people attended their funerals, the biggest republican funerals in Northern Ireland since those of the IRA hunger strikers of 1981.[30]Gerry Adams, in his graveside oration, gave a speech stating the British Government understood that it could buy off the government of the Republic of Ireland, which he described as the "shoneen clan" (that is, Anglophile), but added "it does not understand the Jim Lynaghs, the Pdraig McKearneys or the Samus McElwaines. The IRA members killed in the ambush became known as the "Loughgall Martyrs" among IRA supporters.[29] The men's relatives considered their deaths to be part of a deliberate shoot-to-kill policy by the security forces.

According to journalist Ed Moloney, Michael "Pete" Ryan (himself killed with two other PIRA volunteers on 3 June 1991), an alleged top Brigade member, was the commander of the IRA flying column that launched the attack on Derryard checkpoint in Fermanagh on 13 December 1989.

The unidentified men were unwilling to leave the car until Irish Army soldiers came out of the bushes and pointed Heckler & Koch HK33 rifles at them in support of the Garda.[8] The two men, who wore plain clothes, were Fijian-born trooper Ilisoni Ligari and trooper John Lawson, both soldiers in the SAS. After the kidnapping and murder of Seamus Ludlow near Dundalk, the Republic's security forces stepped up their presence along the border.[8] A checkpoint was set up by the Garda and the Irish Army on Flagstaff Road[9] in the townland of Cornamucklagh, some 700 metres inside County Louth in the Republic.[10]At 10:40 pm, the Garda stopped a Triumph 2000 car coming from the north with two men inside.[10] The driver obeyed the signal to stop, but when questioned by the policemen about their destination, they avoided a straight answer. They were asked to step out of the vehicle after one Garda noticed that the passenger had what seemed to be a gun hidden under a map.

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The shotgun drew the attention of the Garda since the same type of weapon was used in three recent murders in the area. If the roles were reversed we would let you go back. We are all doing the one bloody job", but he eventually ordered his men to surrender their weapons after Irish Army soldiers surrounded both cars and aimed rifles at them.[10] The Garda unit, commanded by Sergeant Pat McLoughlin, radioed his superiors for instructions on how to deal with the men now in custody. Rees and Nicholson were still wearing British Army uniforms. When the soldiers manning the surveillance post failed to meet Ligari and Lawson, they radioed their base at Bessbrook Mill. The Omeath Garda station was ordered to keep the men in custody until a decision was taken at a Governmental level in Dublin. The second cara Vauxhall Victor with Burchell and Rhodeswas stopped shortly after. Initially, an IRA ambush was suspected. Four plain-clothes SAS soldierstroopers Nial McClean, Vincent Thompson, Nigel Burchell and Carsten Rhodeswere sent to search for their missing comrades in two cars, picking up the two men from the observation post in the process.[10] The team was carrying another three Sterling submachine-guns, a Remington pump-action shotgun and 222 rounds of ammunition.[12] The first vehicle a Hillman Avenger carrying Thompson, McClean, Rees and Nicholson - drove up to the Garda checkpoint at 2:05 am. Sergeant Rees tried to explain the situation to the Garda: "Let us go back.

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The survivor says that when he located Declan Arthurs and the other scout they were sitting on the roadside monitoring the police station, which at this time (unknown to them) was manned by six SAS men and three officers, including two members of the specialist Headquarters Mobile Support Unit (HMSU) and a local officer in case a member of the public arrived at the barracks door.

Form - Half-Time

An imposing building, the Manor was once the home of the Cope family who arrived as part of the Plantation of Ulster in the 17th century. Loughgall was named after a small nearby loch. The village is at the heart of the apple-growing industry and is surrounded by orchards. Along the village's main street is a large set of gates leading to Loughgall Manor.

The NI Horticulture and Plant Breeding Station is set in the Loughgall Manor Estate, surrounded by mature woodlands and overlooking the Lough Gall. In 1947 the estate was purchased from Major-General G.W.R. The estate was established in the late 17th century by Sir Anthony Cope of Hanwell, Oxfordshire and became the Cope family home for 350 years. Templer (later Field Marshal Sir Gerald Templer), a descendant of the original owner, by the (then) Ministry of Agriculture.

Eight were killed and the rest were badly wounded. The bombing was at Teebane Crossroads, near Cookstown. As the men were all Protestants, many Protestants saw it as a sectarian attack. One of the workers killed, Robert Dunseath, was an off-duty Royal Irish Rangers soldier.[57] The IRA said that the men were legitimate targets because they were "collaborating" with the "forces of occupation". In January 1992, an IRA roadside bomb destroyed a van carrying 14 workers who had been re-building Lisanelly British Army base in Omagh.

Background[edit]

An Phoblacht claimed the IRA men thwarted an ambush and at least two SAS members were killed.[31] A second shooting took place in the village of Pomeroy on 28 June, this time against British regular troops. On 24 March 1990, there was a gun battle between an IRA unit and undercover British forces at the village of Cappagh, County Tyrone, in which IRA members fired at a civilian-type car driven by security forces, according to Archie Hamilton, then Secretary of State for Defence.[30] Hamilton stated that there were no security or civilian casualties. One soldier was seriously wounded.[32] In October 1990, two IRA volunteers from the brigade (Dessie Grew and Martin McCaughey) were shot dead near Loughgall by SAS undercover members while allegedly collecting two rifles from an IRA arms dump.

The second was an attack on an RUC base at The Birches on 11 August 1986. Members of the unit, such as Jim Lynagh and Pdraig McKearney, advocated a strategy of destroying bases and preventing them being rebuilt or repaired in an attempt to "deny ground" to British forces.[10][11] In 1985, Patrick Joseph Kelly became its commander and began implementing the strategy. In both attacks, the bases were raked with machine-gun fire and then severely damaged with homemade bombs. In 1985 and 1986, it carried out two major attacks on Royal Ulster Constabulary bases.[12] The first was an attack on the RUC barracks in Ballygawley on 7 December 1985, in which two police officers were shot dead. By the mid-1980s it had become one of the IRA's most aggressive formations. The IRA's East Tyrone Brigade was active mainly in eastern County Tyrone and neighbouring parts of County Armagh.