Grange (@1.62) vs Shane O'Neills (@2.63)
06-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Grange will win

Grange – Shane O'Neills Match Prediction | 06-10-2019 11:00

J. The nickname "Shane the Proud" (Irish: Sen an Domais), which appears in nineteenth and early twentieth century popular histories, was coined some time after his death by English writers, and originally had the pejorative meaning of "arrogant", because they wished to portray him as vain, self-indulgent and ruthless, and thus undermine the legitimacy of his claim to the earldom of Tyrone.[6]Holinshed's Chronicles of 1587, for instance, had a side-note, "The proud taunts of Shane O'neile", the text remarking that "when the commissioners were sent to intreat with him vpon sundrie points, they found him most arrogant & out of all good order, braieng out speches not met nor semelie."[7] Later Irish writers, such as John Mitchel and P.

All Shane's marriages were of this type. His first wife was Catherine, the daughter of James MacDonald of Dunnyveg, Lord of the Isles. The O'Neill married Catherine while the MacDonnells were providing him with military support during the 1550s to contest the Lordship of Tyrone with his father Conn Bacach, at the time The O'Neill. If the alliance fell apart, the wife could return to her father in a form of political divorce. The custom among the nobility of sixteenth-century Ireland was for marriage to be undertaken to cement political alliances between powerful or enemy families.

Catherine and her children had accompanied the O'Neill and his entourage to the MacDonnell camp at Castle Cara below Ballyterrim, and after his assassination they fled across the river Bann to the forest of Glenconkeyne, where they were protected by a lord of the Clandeboye O'Neills. Catherine made her way to safety at Duart Castle, where her brother fostered the youngest of Shane's children, those who had been born to his sister, while offering protection to the other MacShanes. The O'Shane was, however, still married to Catherine on 2 June 1567, the day of his assassination at Castle Cara, Cushendun, at the hands of a MacDonnell group with whom he was negotiating possible military aid.

Facilities[edit]

The O'Neill offered some concessions, most significantly consenting to present himself before Elizabeth in London to argue his case against Sussex and the Baron of Dungannon in person. Elizabeth consented to treat, and hostilities ceased on terms that gave the O'Neill practically all his demands. The O'Neill requested the hand of Sussex's half-sister Lady Frances Radclyffe in marriage as an earnest of future friendship. Accompanied by the Earls of Ormonde and Kildare as surety for his safety, the O'Neill reached London on 4 January 1562. William Camden describes the wonder which his gallowglasses occasioned in the English capital, with their heads bare, their long hair falling over their shoulders and clipped short in front above the eyes, and clothed in saffron-dyed shirts of fine linen.

There were at this time three powerful contemporary members of the ONeill family in IrelandShane, Turlough, and Hugh, 2nd Earl of Tyrone. Elizabeth at last authorized Sussex to take the field against Shane, but two expeditions failed. Turlough had schemed to supplant Shane during Shanes absence in London. Shane then laid the whole blame for his lawless conduct on the lord deputys repeated alleged attempts on his life. Elizabeth consented to negotiate, and practically all Shanes demands were conceded. The feud did not long survive Shanes return to Ireland, where he reestablished his authority and renewed his turbulent tribal warfare.

Unable to succeed against O'Neill in battle, Sussex tried in 1561 to assassinate him using poisoned wine. The O'Neill now called the lord deputy to account for his unnatural enmity, as displayed in this most recent of many attempts on his life. The O'Neill destroyed the greater part of Sussex's invasion army at the Battle of the Red Sagums, 18 July 1561, while Sussex was deep in O'Neill-controlled territory garrisoning Armagh with a small body of men. Afterwards Elizabeth sent the Earl of Kildare to arrange terms with the O'Neill, who was demanding a complete withdrawal of the English from his territory.

The Under-14 Girls team formed in the early 2000s won the Armagh championship in 2009. In the same year they were runners-up in the All-County League, and participated in the Kilmacud 7s and Ulster and All-Ireland File competitions.

External links[edit]

Agnes was the illegitimate sister of Catherine's earlier husband, the Earl of Argyll. Between May and June 1567, while the O'Neill was attempting to negotiate a military alliance with the MacDonnells in the wake of his catastrophic defeat at battle of Farsetmore, he discussed the possibility of divorcing Catherine MacLean to marry his current lover, Agnes Campbell, widow of James MacDonald; the O'Neill had captured her with her husband at the Battle of Glentasie in 1565.

Shane O'Neill (Irish: Sen Mac Cuinn Nill; c. This brought him into conflict with competing branches of the O'Neill family and with the English government in Ireland, who recognised a rival claim. Shanes's support was considered worth gaining by the English even during the lifetime of his father Conn O'Neill, 1st Earl of Tyrone (died 1559). 1530 2 June 1567), was an Irish chieftain of the O'Neill dynasty of Ulster in the mid 16th century. Shane O'Neill's career was marked by his ambition to be The O'Neill sovereign of the dominant O'Neill family of Tr Eoghainand thus overlord of the entire province. But rejecting overtures from Thomas Radclyffe, 3rd Earl of Sussex, the lord deputy from 1556, Shane refused to help the English against the Scottish settlers on the coast of Antrim, allying himself instead with the MacDonnells, the most powerful of these immigrants.